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20121226
20121226
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and join the peace corps, volunteered in the inner city or in outer space because he asked them to give back to this country that has given us all so much. generation inspired has passed that commitment on to their children and grandchildren in the continuity of spirit that continues to work for a more just and peaceful world. as we approached the 50th anniversary, my family thought a good deal about how to best celebrate my father service and patriotism. we recognize that his time is becoming part of history. not living memory. that brings opportunities as well as challenges. both my parents loved history and and they pass it on to me to my brother, john. my father read voraciously about the civil war, english parliamentary history and the world wars of the 20th century. my mother preferred the ancient world in 18th century europe. for them come in the past was not a tie and a welfare. but full of exciting people, rate heroes and heroines, and defense that could teach us a great deal about our own times. here at the library we decided to concentrate on making history of the kennedy adm
. if you are in new york city, schoolteachers and firemen make $100,000 a year and they are easily in households the approach the limit. it depends and where you live. among high-income people, there is a wide range of what people pay in taxes. if you're a lawyer in washington, i find them to be reasonable people who work long hours. you are probably paying 28%. if you are on wall street and you are well-connected if you have a capacity to have your income defined as investment as opposed to salary even though it is indeed salary income. if you are somebody like jamie dimon or warren buffet, you can get away with 14% tax. the real problem with upper individuals are not the people who pay the taxes we intend for the to pay, but all the people who get away without paying any taxes at all. those tax breaks and write offs are derived by the president and by democrats, but they never seem to get fixed. one reason is republicans do not want them fixed. and the other hand, the democrats get a lot of campaign contributions from wall street. that is a real problem on both sides of the aisle
parents? >> yes. that was part of my interest. back in the new york city public schools, i had a great teacher. mrs. rauf would read -- mrs. roth would read the newspaper and the about martin luther king. he was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i was handing leaflets out for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party headquarters and was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york'. some women thought this was really cute, this little boy and leaflets. and she asked me why. and i made the case and got in early start in my political career. she said this is for you and she hands this box of pastries. i took a back to the liberal headquarters and we opened it up and there were all of these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics -- the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughn
in confederate ports. the union had chanced the bombardment of the city of vicksburg, and new orleans had fallen. the tennessee, cumberland, and mississippi rivers seem to belong the north, not the south. and it must have seemed for a time in 1862 that this combination of events, particularly the naval successes for the union, were about to end the war between the states. and then the trend line changed. the father of water that lincoln boasted now flowed unvexed to the sea, became vexed all over again. so jim, let's start with you. what happened and why? >> well, the union navy was on a roll in the fall and winter of '61 and '62 and the spring of 1862. and it looked like they were going to open up the mississippi river completely in the summer of 1862. vicksburg was really the only confederate bastion still on the mississippi river, and both the sea-going fleet under, now-admiral david farrogot came up from the gulf of mexico to vicksburg and the so-called we were flotilla of river boats fought down the mississippi, capturing memphis on the way and a number of other places as well, and they com
convention, the former president kicked off his annual clinton global initiative conference in new york city. >> mika and i sat down with the president at the site of the cgi meeting on the same day that both president obama and mitt romney were set to speak there. >> how would you characterize how he's been handling the collective problems that we're seeing percolating across the middle east? >> well, i think that first of all, i think they've done pretty well in a very chaotic situation. the arab spring was always going to have ups and downs or bumps in the road or whatever you want to call it. in libya, the tragic situation of the lost of our ambassador and the other americans, it's worth pointing out a couple of things. first of all, most of the libyan people who were aware of what's going on like the united states, they like the fact that we aggressively supported them and their desire to replace the gadhafi regime and decades of control and repression and a move to a more democratic system. the president of libya has asked to meet with me. we're going to have a nice visit. i think tomo
for city council, for school boards, for municipal government that go unfilled every year because people don't run for them. and you can start anywhere. so i would say to all the women in the audience, to all of your children, to all of your girls cannot tell them to run because that is how we will get aoman president pierre >> that is a great point pierre >> i had 24 hours to make my decision about running the first time for state senate. i would not have run. i called my husband and said they asked me care at the kids and the law practice and you have your job. and my husband said you are really did this and we will make it work. >> the corollary about the minivan and the phone, my boys, when there were little, they used to say, mom, you are always on the phone. i told them that i get paid by the word. [laughter] >> i would not have run for senate if it were not for my husband. i quit my role as attorney general entered a year-and-a- half off of work. we went from one income -- we went from two incomes to one income. he said, i will make it work. i want your voicehere. it does take som
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6